“… a proven stimulus of innovation —  the meeting of unlike minds.”
Thomas Stewart, 2001

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Search results for augmented

Augmented Reality in Healthcare

Augmented Reality in Healthcare

Where AR Began for Unlike Minds

Unlike Minds began experimenting with augmented reality (AR) in 2004 when we helped The Education Department at Manchester Metropolitan University to win one of the Department for Education’s first research contract in the field. The result was a character called Scimorph, an extraterrestrial that gave the learners the sensation that it was sitting on the target card in their hands and responding to various scenarios the learner requested.

Since then there have been many advances in AR software, especially as applications for mobile phones. Furthermore The Monastery studio is now equipped with green screen facilities and high end cameras so that the team can now produce films for AR projects in house. This enables the team to develop visitor attraction AR films for The Monastery as well as projects for contracting clients.

There are two Unlike minds projects currently taking advantage of AR: one related to healthcare the other to learning and neuroscience:

AR and healthcare.

The following video was was produced by NHS Employers to showcase Unlike Minds’ innovative use of augmented reality in the consulting room and later with family and friends.

The video below illustrates the process in a little more detail.

Health and Wellbeing lead page

Health and Well-being - projects overview

The World Health Innovation Summit

Unlike Minds is a proud partner of The World Health Innovation Summit (WHIS)  and David Dickinson is a member of the management team.  Gareth Presch, WHIS’s Founder and Chief Executive is happy to be regarded as an Unlike Minds Associate, as too is the WHIS Chair, Dr Amir Hannan. Naturally Gareth’s current parallel role as adviser to the UN Sustainable Development Goals programme, and Amir’s as a busy doctor in general practice, doesn’t permit a great deal of involvement, but both serve as a hand on the tiller for our big projects. 

The i-Space Navigator

By far our biggest project is the i-Space Navigator project, where our health and wellbeing, and our teaching and learning merge as initiatives to be what we believe to be a key service for the future of guided self care. 

The project was conceived by the Unlike Minds founders David Dickinson and David Oliver in the late ’90s, gained a little more momentum when David Alexander joined them in 2016 and is rapidly attracting more interested parties.

Click i-Space Navigator for further details.

Augmented Reality in General Practice

Since leading a successful national Augmented Reality project for the Department of Education in 2012, Unlike Minds has been exploring its use in such diverse areas as travel and tourism and teaching & learning. This particular application of the technology was designed to assist GPs to help patients, their families and friends to accommodate lifestyle changes. Click here for the explanation and video.

Salutogenesis: Sense of Coherence and Meaning-Making

A submission has been made to UNGSII via WHIS to establish the Manchester SDG 3 / 4 hub. More to follow.

Learning and Teaching lead page

Learning and Teaching.

A number of Unlike Minds associates have a long track record of innovation in learning and teaching.

Dr Rebecca Torrance Jenkins is an educational neuroscientist, presenter and author. Together with Unlike Minds associates Ray Hanks and David Oliver, they initiated the project Neurofiles which takes  neuroscience research directly into schools. 

 

She is involved in two other education initiatives: 

Neuroscience in Learning Together with David Oliver, they have developed a programme that enables schools to evaluate neuroscience research findings and make informed decisions as to what changes might be made at the whole school or individual classroom levels.

Neuroscience in parenting (a book to be published by …. on …

Rebecca also has two involvements in the health and wellbeing domain:

Augmented reality in general practice. Working with Ray Hanks, David Oliver, Amir Hannan and David Dickinson.

The Good Summit (Dublin, 2019) speaking on behalf of the World Health Innovation Summit 

 

David Oliver is a Founding Director of Unlike Minds and has a wealth of experience in education leadership, leading school governors, developing and delivering school improvement programmes. Within the education domain, well as being involved with the Neuroscience in Learning programme with Rebecca, he leads on:

Breakthrough Performance Environments. David helped to lead a ground-breaking action-research project formed from global organisations based in the USA and Europe. They considered what factors might promote amazing results – breakthrough performance. Would it be possible to deliberately construct environments where breakthrough performance was more likely than in other environments, and if so, what would you need to focus on to realise them? This project was the beginning of David’s work on, and continuing exploration of, breakthrough performance environments. You can find more on this fascinating consultancy offer here.

The Brain-Friendly, Growth Mindset School. (the research-informed learning environment.) Drawing upon research in education, educational neuroscience and cognitive psychology, David has worked with Rebecca to bring relevant findings, and their implications, to schools across the north-west. The combination of children learning about what’s happening in their brains when they’re learning with psychological insights into motivation and success plus teacher awareness of what really makes a difference to learning has delivered significant impact in the pilot stage, with noticeable benefits in behaviour for and attitude to learning in primary schools.

Applying Technology to Learning. Working for Manchester Metropolitan University, David led one of the first DfE-funded initiatives in the use of augmented reality to support engagement of pupils in science. Working in partnership with The Monastery Manchester David has used immersive display technology to engage pupils in creative writing,  performance and self-regulation. Augmented reality has featured again too, with initiatives at the Monastery (visitor experience) and in schools, using readily-available technologies to ‘bring objects or images to life’.

Research-informed Personal Development.  With research indicating that short training courses – especially if relying on ‘cascade’ to reach colleagues – struggle to achieve sustainable impact in schools, David explored the use of action-research to improve professional development. Practitioners working together to explore areas of interest in their own classrooms provides the raw data for structured conversations on aspects of practice that highlights next steps. This self-reflective approach has proven to be a powerful tool in staff development in those schools that have experimented with it..

Splash 101

Unlike Minds is a capability network whose associates are at the leading edge of social change thinking. We come together to address complex problems with creative and elegant solutions.

We are delighted to welcome Hank Kune (centre) to Unlike Minds. He has a wealth of experience in community engagement. Hank lives in the Netherlands.
Gorton Monastery in Manchester UK, the spiritual home of Unlike Minds now a Global Hub for the SDG Cities Programme.
The Power of Interaction: i-Space Navigator, twenty years in the gestation, Unlike Minds' game-changing concept for an independent experience layer for the Internet.
As part of their growing role as a partner of the World Health Innovation Summit, Unlike Minds produced this diagram emphasising community in post-covid19 society.

Scroll down for story archive

Through partners Neurofiles, we've been showing children (and their teachers) the difference an understanding of neuroscience can make to learning and teaching.
We first became involved with augmented reality in 2008 when we won a contract with the UK government. More recently we turned our attention to GP practices.
In April 2020, David D joined the management team of the World Health Innovation Summit as SDG3 Expert: Information Strategy.
Understanding the relationship between information and meaning-making is critical to us. We organised and hosted a virtual global conference for #sHday17.
Unlike Mind associates present at conferences on learning and healthcare around the globe.
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We are rather proud of the Unlike Minds brand. This page explains the derivation of the name and the geometric logo, both of which have multiple layers of meaning.

Dr Rebecca Torrance Jenkins

Dr. Rebecca Torrance Jenkins is an educational neuroscientist, science teacher and author. Once a teacher of prep-school science and a tutor for all three sciences at GCSE, she recognised that teaching and learning strategies were rarely informed by the way the children’s brains actually functioned. Wishing to pursue this  further she undertook a doctoral research programme in which findings from neuroscience and cognitive psychology were trialled in prep and secondary science teaching. The most effective strategies were expanded and refined for the NeuroFiles project, which piloted in a single large primary school. Through word of mouth, the project has now worked with over ten schools across the North West and Midlands, often in very deprived areas. Its success was more rapid and wide-reaching than initially anticipated, and the final version is both easily implemented and highly successful – attitude to learning, classroom behaviour and outcomes have been significantly impacted. As one head teacher put it: “Its crazy that until now, no one has considered the most important factor in learning: the brain!”

Rebecca was introduced to Unlike Minds by associate Ray Hanks.  Ray and Rebecca’s first project together was an augmented reality project exploring how augmented reality might help people to understand the neuroscience behind stress. This programme was developed in-house as a Monastery Studios Production. See the video produced by NHS Employers to showcase innovative initiatives.

https://vimeopro.com/user2677238/neurofiles-education .

Neuroscience in parenting In response to the many questions she has been asked by parents during her work with schools, Rebecca is attempting to answer them from a neuroscientific perspective in a book that deals with some of the hardest parenting issues, such as computer gaming, anxiety, sexual relationships and porn, exam revision and conflict with parents. Soon to be published!

See Rebecca’s papers and publications.

Ray Hanks

Ray Hanks

Ray worked for three of the Top 10 Ad Agencies in the UK, and was Managing Director of the biggest specialist agency in Europe with billings of £40 million.  As Head of Creative & Digital Industries at the North West Development Agency, he set up the team to help secure the BBC’s relocation and the creation of the iconic MediaCityUK in Salford Quays.

Ray is an award-winning business adviser (Institute of Consulting – Best Business Growth) for creative and digital businesses, including advertising agencies, film and TV specialists, and was part of the record-breaking business support initiative in England’s North West, impacting on £511 million of sales and 5,300 jobs.  He has trained over 1,500 people to set up their own businesses, was Interim Director of the Northern Net Innovation Programme, a trained assessor for the National Clinical Assessment Service reviewing underperforming NHS clinicians, has trained all of the lawyers and claims specialists for the NHS Litigation Authority (NHS Resolution), is an alumnus and Member of Court of The City University London, and an External Adviser for The University of Salford.

Having worked closely with David Dickinson and David Oliver for many years, Ray is committed to the pursuit of change for good, through innovative thinking and creative collaborations.  He is an adviser to Creative Life at The Monastery, which incorporates The Monastery Studios offering green screen film production facilities.  The services include the outstanding photography of Mark Copeland, drone filming with 4K video and high-resolution images, augmented reality services bringing still images to life and a suite of magical products featuring pictures that talk.

The collaboration with Dr Rebecca Torrance Jenkins resulted in the creation of the NeuroFiles project, an ambitious media programme highlighting how neuroscience impacts on everything we do. Over twenty videos have already been filmed and produced at The Monastery Studios. It is a perfect fit for the wider ambition and philosophy of Unlike Minds.

Bio Ray Hanks

Ray Hanks     

Ray worked for three of the Top 10 Ad Agencies in the UK, and was Managing Director of the biggest specialist agency in Europe with billings of £40 million.  As Head of Creative & Digital Industries at the North West Development Agency, he set up the team to help secure the BBC’s relocation and the creation of the iconic MediaCityUK in Salford Quays.

Ray is an award-winning business adviser (Institute of Consulting – Best Business Growth) for creative and digital businesses, including advertising agencies, film and TV specialists, and was part of the record-breaking business support initiative in England’s North West, impacting on £511 million of sales and 5,300 jobs.  He has trained over 1,500 people to set up their own businesses, was Interim Director of the Northern Net Innovation Programme, a trained assessor for the National Clinical Assessment Service reviewing underperforming NHS clinicians, has trained all of the lawyers and claims specialists for the NHS Litigation Authority (NHS Resolution), is an alumnus and Member of Court of The City University London, and an External Adviser for The University of Salford. 

Having worked closely with David Dickinson and David Oliver for many years, Ray is committed to the pursuit of change for good, through innovative thinking and creative collaborations.  He is an adviser to Creative Life at The Monastery, which incorporates The Monastery Studios offering green screen film production facilities.  The services include the outstanding photography of Mark Copeland, drone filming with 4K video and high-resolution images, augmented reality services bringing still images to life and a suite of magical products featuring pictures that talk. The collaboration with Dr Rebecca Torrance Jenkins resulted in the creation of the NeuroFiles project, an ambitious media programme highlighting how neuroscience impacts on everything we do. Over twenty videos have already been filmed and produced at The Monastery Studios. It is a perfect fit for the wider ambition and philosophy of Unlike Minds.   

Healthcare

Unlike Minds uses Augmented Reality (AM) 

This is a great case study to explain the way in which Unlike Minds operates as an associate network. Ray and Rebecca were working on an an AM project to explain the neuroscience of stress. Together they set up an organisation called Neurofiles. David D and Amir took the trigger cards and videos they developed into the context of the doctor’s consulting room. Ray and David explored further possibilities with the NHS. At the same time with Rebecca, David O extend his work in schools to share with teachers pedagogy informed by neuroscience research.

Extending ‘the magic of the consulting room’.

Amir frequently talks of the ‘magic of the consulting room’ the space where together doctor and patient work out the best way to tackle the emergence of ill health. The success of that patient/doctor interaction is critical to the patient owning their health and it changes. Too often however, in the case of serious health issues, the patient listens to the doctor for the first few seconds and then fear and anxiety take over, blanking out the further information. Many doctors use leaflets for the patients to take away to read and to share with their families. However leaflets, especially medical ones, often have higher reading ages than their patients.

Unlike Minds responded to this challenge by developing a set of postcards which when viewed by a smartphone camera, triggers a two minute video. The film for the project, featuring Rebecca, was shot in-house at The Monastery. The idea is is that the patient can take the card away and show it to family members and friends. It is sufficiently novel for notice to be taken of its contents. The first series of four cards about stress were produced for a pilot. In the video below, produced by NHS Employers, Amir, Ray and David D explain: 

 

i-Space Navigator Charter

 

i-Space Navigator Charter

 

Purpose of this document

This document sets out the charter[1] for the i-Space Navigator: its vision, mission, values and purpose. Its development is entrusted to an entity that will coordinate the realisation of i-Space Navigator concept: its instantiation into publicly available specifications; a reference open source code implementation, available to anyone who is prepared to sign up to the open source licence and approach and implement it within their own applications, services and products and/or develop content that can be delivered through it to individuals.

Context at signing

In 2017 when this has been drafted we are in a period of unprecedented and accelerating change, change that is unpredictable, change that is seeing shifts in the locus of control and the realisation that there is a need to explore and embrace new modes of working and collaborating across all strata of society, economy and state. This document arises from the belief that how individuals manage and make meaning from information needs to change and move to a person-centred approach. This represents a massive opportunity for individuals, society, the economy and nation states to deliver increased efficiency, insight, awareness, knowledge and engagement, coupled with reduced risk, cost and effort. We believe this contributes significantly to the well-being of the individual, communities and society as a whole.

Governance of i-Space Navigator

At its outset the three individuals leading this programme: David Oliver; David Dickinson and David Alexander represent the governance body for the foreseeable future, until a formal legal entity is either established or an existing one is identified as the logical home for the assets being created.

Mission

To empower individuals to manage their whole life journey and interaction with the world around them at all life stages, events and regular processes and to do so in a more effective manner through convenient, trustworthy means of independently orientating themselves within the digital world, navigating to the right information and services they need and engaging and personalising and automating where relevant in an effective and impactful manner with minimal effort and maximum value that evolves with them over their life.

Vision

A world in which human beings from the earliest possible age are able to manage their lives and the world around intuitively and effectively and build their knowledge and capability incrementally and tune and adapt as they grow and develop. A world where content and services are delivered to the individual via their own control surfaces and interfaces seamlessly the way they want them to be.

Values

Ethical intermediation for trustworthy meaning making – i-Space Navigator will consistently adopt a person centric approach to design where the individual is in control, empowered and enabled to manage the world around them in the most appropriate manner to meet their needs in the context of any activity, event or stage of their lives.

  • Universal applicability – i-Space Navigator is for everyone: individuals as they interact with organisations (public, private, social, charitable) nation states, civil society as a whole,
  • Freedom of access i-Space Navigator free to access and use as a framework and open source code base
  • Equality of access – Commitment to inclusive, accessible interoperability, portability and extensibility, multi-cultural, multi-lingual, multi-modal
  • Adaptability – i-Space Navigator anticipates and accepts that the interface surfaces on which it will be used will change and evolve over time from today’s de facto modes, such as web, smart devices, to consider and include e.g. synaptic, optical, embedded, augmented AI assisted
  • Independence – i-Space Navigator will remain Independent, protected, evolving, and mission led
  • Architectural separation – The content and services delivered within i-Space Navigator are separate from the core framework
  • Diversity of use – Motivations can be diverse for i-Space Navigator use for example for social good; commercial; transitional; transformative; health and social care; well being; safety critical; efficiency gains; risk reduction; costs reductions; knowledge growth.
  • Economic Diversity – i-Space Navigator supports any number of models of access, free, chargeable in form or another, linked to status and entitlements
  • Advocacy – we will promote, evangelise and educate about the benefits of a person centred approach and the adoption of i-Space Navigator.

Strategy

We accept this is a transformational shift in the way in which individuals will interact with the world around them and it may take generations to become the defacto way of working in this new Independent Engagement layer.  The strategy is to

  • Research – the external component will be horizon scanning for useful thinking on technology and human cognitive sciences, plus an internal component around understanding and modelling impact and benefits from a person centred approach to the empowerment of individuals and the benefits to society and the economy.
  • Define – The foundations, metaphors and concepts for the i-Space Navigator and decompose these into specific functional building blocks within a specification that can be implemented into an open source code base and supporting documentation and tools to enable anyone to develop content and implementations of i-Space Navigator.
  • Test – Continually test design and concepts with human beings across different demographics and use cases to inform design and development of the core specification and components.
  • Fund – A mixture of grant, crowdsourcing, donations and sponsorship and project involvement that generates revenue. None must undermine the independence of the i-Space Navigator and its mission.
  • Build – Create a core team of architects, developers, consultants and legal advisers some paid, some donating their time and input to the framework
  • Engage – Seeking out pilots, and projects to demonstrate examples of use cases, provide support and guidance through mixture of online resources and events
  • Evidence and insights – build evidence of impact and value across all domains, through case studies in range of formats, sharing lessons learned
  • Inspire – adoption and embedding into all contexts of human endeavour through ongoing communications programme.
  • Equipcontent, service and product providers to easily understand, embrace and adopt i-Space Navigator through provision of clear documentation, resources and benefits case, incentives.
  • Maintain and protect – through the formation of an entity (or alignment to an existing organisation) to protect and maintain the integrity and relevance of core assets.
  • Evolve and extend – ensure the assets remain relevant and are extended and evolved to meet emerging needs, paradigms and use cases for orientation, navigation and engagement

Execution

Execution is fundamental to success and we will take the following approach:-

  • Evidence based – iterative approach, avoiding boil the ocean, accepting the need for architecture and vision but testing and tuning as we go.
  • Frugality – We are not empire building, we seek to use the most efficient and effective means of executing our mission and strategy, we won’t reinvent the wheel and we will use open source components that exist today as well as, free tools and services that keep our costs down and improve collaboration. We will seek to engage talent wherever it exists who wish to collaborate and contribute.
  • Asset building – we will capture and document our learning and experiences as we go and ensure we make these assets available in an easy to access and use manner, ultimately via i-Space Navigator.
  • Identify bounded information spaces where i-Space Navigator can be deployed and tested against a subset to verify and validate the approach. The purpose is to avoid boiling the ocean and build proof sources for the value.
  • No use of proprietary technology or processes that will embed dependency and barriers to access and use of the i-Space Navigator.
  • No commercial agreements that would conflict with this charter, we accept that this may make things take longer but mission protection is core.
  • Collaborate where the potential for adoption is strongest, and best aligned to our mission.
  • We will maintain a strategic, tactical and operational classification over our work at all times in order prioritise and differentiate clearly.

Adopted 27th July 2017. Signatories David Dickinson, David Oliver, David Alexander [1] Charter in this context means, terms of reference, statement of common understanding, the Why of our activities and the light that guides future work.

Bio David-Oliver

David Oliver

David Oliver is a Founding Director of Unlike Minds and has a wealth of experience in education leadership, leading school governors, developing and delivering school improvement programmes. Within the education domain, as well as being involved with the School as a Research-Informed Learning Environment programme with Dr Rebecca Torrance Jenkins, he leads on:

Breakthrough Performance Environments. David helped to lead a ground-breaking action-research project formed from global organisations based in the USA and Europe. They considered what factors might promote amazing results – breakthrough performance. Would it be possible to deliberately construct environments where breakthrough performance was more likely than in other environments, and if so, what would you need to focus on to realise them? This project was the beginning of David’s work on, and continuing exploration of, breakthrough performance environments. here

Applying Technology to Learning. Working for Manchester Metropolitan University, David led one of the first DfE-funded initiatives in the use of augmented reality to support engagement of pupils in science. Working in partnership with The Monastery Manchester, David has used immersive display technology to engage pupils in creative writing,  performance and self-regulation. Augmented reality has featured again too, with initiatives at the Monastery (visitor experience) and in schools, using readily-available technologies to ‘bring objects or images to life’.

Research-informed Personal Development.  With research indicating that short training courses – especially if relying on ‘cascade’ to reach colleagues – struggle to achieve sustainable impact in schools, David explored the use of action-research to improve professional development. Practitioners working together to explore areas of interest in their own classrooms provides the raw (descriptive) data for structured conversations on aspects of practice that highlights next steps. This self-reflective approach has proven to be a powerful tool in staff development in those schools that have adopted it.